Tag Archives: Firefox

Goodbye, Xmarks! (again)

I got an email from LastPass that they’re dropping Xmarks on May 1. Xmarks is a cross-browser bookmark sync service that I’ve used for a long time to keep Chrome, Firefox, IE, and Safari on multiple computers using the same set of bookmarks.

Once it’s gone I can still sync Firefox across devices, Chrome across devices, etc., but that doesn’t help with syncing Firefox, Chrome, etc. with each other.

That said, it’s been a bit flaky for a while:

  • Anytime I came back to a system without using it for a while, it would have trouble syncing and have to re-download everything.
  • Sometimes it gets confused by the different folder layouts.
  • Since Firefox dropped their old extension API, the new extension hasn’t worked well with my scheme that drops all cookies when I close the browser except those on sites I want to stay logged into.

Maybe someone will pick them up again, like when they planned to close down in 2010 but LastPass bought them and took it freemium. On the other hand, I’m not sure I would trust someone who wanted to buy them now. Maybe I should pull my data early.

Whatever the case: If you sync bookmarks across different browsers, what do you use? Would you recommend it?

Can’t Log into Feedly or Pinterest on Firefox 40? Check Ghostery!

I use Feedly to keep up with a lot of sites ranging from tech to entertainment. After upgrading to Firefox 40, I wasn’t able to log in using my Google account. The authentication pop-up would only bring up a plain HTML page saying, “Moved Temporarily The document has moved here.” The same problem occurs with Pinterest and Facebook login, though in that case the authentication pop-up is blank. Pocket also shows the “Moved Temporarily” message, but recovers. I’m having trouble logging into Disqus too. Lots (but not all) of third-party logins seem to be broken now.

Update: Ghostery 5.4.8 fixes the problem!

TL;DR: Use this workaround!

  1. Go into Add-Ons and disable Ghostery.
  2. Log into Feedly / Pinterest / whatever.
  3. Go back into Add-Ons and re-enable Ghostery.

A discussion on Google+ suggested disabling add-ons. I tried it, and was able to log in — great! But I wanted to know which extension was the problem.

After experimenting a bit, I found that disabling Ghostery allowed me to log into Feedly with Google.

Just to make certain, I logged out of Feedly, re-enabled Ghostery, and tried logging back in. Sure enough, I was back to the “Moved Temporarily…” error again. I’ve had Ghostery on this browser for a long time with no problems, and the about page shows that the extension was last updated toward the end of July, so I assume the problem is that something in Firefox 40 changed the way the browser, Ghostery and OAuth interact. I wouldn’t be surprised if it runs into issues with other privacy add-ons like AdBlock or Privacy Badger.

Fortunately, Ghostery can be turned on and off without restarting your browser. And turning it back on after you’re logged in doesn’t seem to interfere with Feedly.

I may go back and try to figure out the specific setting that’s causing the issue, but for now, I’m able to run both Feedly and Ghostery, so I’m not in too much of a hurry.

Update: Ghostery will be releasing a fix to resolve the bug, which turns out to affect quite a few sites. (via Feedly on Google+.) Update: Ghostery 5.4.6.1 is supposed to fix the problem, but it still breaks login on some sites, including Feedly and Pinterest.

Update: Ghostery 5.4.8 fixes the problem!

Firefox 4 Beta: The Missing Status Bar

If you’ve been following the Firefox 4 betas, you’ve probably noticed that they’re dumping the status bar. OK, a lot of people didn’t use it, but here’s the thing:

When you hover over a link, the status bar tells you where it will take you.

This is important (especially for security) — important enough that they’ve moved the functionality elsewhere…but in a broken manner. They’ve put it into the location bar — you know, the field where you type in a URL, or look to see where you are.

The problem is that there isn’t room in the location bar to show the full URL of a hovered link except for very short links. The status bar has the entire width of the browser. The location bar has to share that space with the navigation buttons, the search box, the feedback button (during the beta), any custom toolbar buttons, the site name on secure websites, etc.

Just about every link I hover over ends up with critical information cut off in the “…” between the start of the hostname and the parameters at the end. That’s almost useless. (Almost, because at least the hostname is visibla, but it would help to see the page name as well.)

Displaying the target URL in some way is core functionality for a web browser, and you shouldn’t remove or break core functionality. In some ways this is worse than the proposal a few years ago to remove “View Source,” because that at least isn’t core functionality for a browser (though it is core functionality for the web, because it encourages people to explore and tinker and learn how to make their own websites — which is exactly why that was put back in). It’s crazy that I need to install an add-on to get back something as basic as a working preview for links.

Links: Paper, Flickr, D&D Advice, LEGO Firefox, etc.

Some interesting links I’ve encountered over the past week or two.

And now some techie stuff:

  • Interesting idea: Paper.li extracts links posted by Twitter and Facebook accounts you follow, then creates a daily newspaper page featuring headlines, links and excerpts from the top stories.
  • Thomas Hawk’s Open Letter to Carol Bartz, CEO Yahoo Inc. on why Yahoo! should consider Flickr a core product.
  • Firefox made of LEGO

Edit: Not a link, but I should mention: between a bug in Akismet and me not having time to go through it, I ended up with more than 2,000 comments in the spam folder just from the last 3 weeks. I don’t have time to look through that many items for false positives, so I just cleared it all out. If you left a legitimate comment that hasn’t shown up on the site, I apologize.

Farewell, Xmarks Bookmark Sync!

It’s not a huge surprise, with all the major web browsers adding their own bookmark sync services, but Xmarks (formerly Foxmarks) is shutting down in January.

I figure I’ll just use Firefox Sync, Chrome sync, Opera Link, etc. to share bookmarks between the desktop and laptop, but what I really liked Xmarks for was its ability to sync different browsers together. I’m always switching between Chrome, Firefox, Opera and Safari (and occasionally IE when I’m on a Windows box) and it’s nice to have them all on the same set of bookmarks.

I guess it’s back to periodically exporting from my main browser and importing in the secondary ones, unless I find a tool or find the time to read up on the bookmarks formats and write one.

Update: Xmarks lives!