Tag Archives: Fedora

NVIDIA on Fedora 27: Bad Resolution & Painful Mouse Lag (Fixed)

I’ve been using an older NVIDIA graphics card in my Fedora Linux workstation for a long time. I finally decided to upgrade to a newer one, which meant uninstalling the legacy drivers, then installing the current NVIDIA drivers.

Using the RPMFusion packages simplified it, because I only had to do the following to uninstall the old nvidia-340xx driver and install the new one:

dnf remove xorg-x11-drv-nvidia\*
dnf install xorg-x11-drv-nvidia akmod-nvidia
reboot

(Of course, I still had to hit ESC during boot, CTRL+ALT+2 to get to a text console, and log in without access to copy/paste or windowing.)

But it didn’t work. Oh, it brought up the GDM login screen, sure, but the mouse cursor and keyboard response were so slow I could barely even click on the form. It would move normally for about a second, then simply stop for five seconds. You can’t use a computer like that. Even if it had let me log in — it didn’t — there wouldn’t have been any point.

Additionally, the resolution was slightly off, with the aspect ratio on everything stretched vertically.

And of course I couldn’t use any of the graphical utilities to adjust settings, because I couldn’t run anything graphical.

I tried all kinds of things to fix it:

  • Creating an xorg.conf file with nvidia-xconfig. (no change)
  • Manually adding an xorg.conf section setting the resolution to the monitor’s native resolution. (no change)
  • Completely reverting to Linux’s built-in nouveau drivers, uninstalling all traces of nvidia and reinstalling Xorg and mesa as suggested at RPMFusion. That made the computer work again, but 3D graphics were slow. Reinstalling the nvidia packages fresh took me back to square one.

Nothing I could find online was remotely helpful. It was all about making sure the drivers were installed correctly, which I’d done, or configuring X.org, which (a) I’d done, and (b) hadn’t made any difference. (Fortunately I had another device I could look this stuff up on!)

Finally, just as I decided to revert to nouveau again just to have a working system and table the question of 3D acceleration until later, I hit upon an idea.

Wayland, the new display framework, isn’t compatible with the official NVIDIA drivers. I hadn’t had any problems with nvidia-340xx, so I figured I’d long since disabled Wayland and forgotten, but just for kicks, I switched over to the text console and tried

ps -ef | grep -i wayland

…and found that Wayland was running!

But Fedora’s GDM is supposed to fall back to X.org when it’s not able to run (the nvidia drivers are mentioned specifically). Maybe it recognized the old driver as incompatible, but thought (wrongly) that the new one could handle it?

Fortunately, that page also offered the solution:

Edit /etc/gdm/custom.conf, and put the following line in the [daemon] section:

WaylandEnable=false

The line’s actually in there already, commented out.

Literally, the solution to the problem that had me tearing my hair out for an hour was to delete a single #.

GDM displayed correctly, mouse and keyboard responded smoothly, and I was able to log in just fine…and 3D was much faster than my old card.

Problem solved!

But only because I finally realized I needed to look for Wayland.

Setting up a Wireless Network on Linux: Ralink 3062 and Network Manager

Ah, memories! These days, setting up hardware on Linux is often easier than it is in Windows. Lots of drivers are built-in and auto-detected, and many are provided through a distribution channel that makes it almost as easy.

Wireless networking, however, is a bit of a throwback to the old days. Half the hardware doesn’t have Linux drivers, and half of the devices that do require you to hunt for the driver — based on the chipset, of course, not on the name or model number on the box — and compile it yourself. (At least these days, you can sometimes run a tool to adapt the Windows drivers if there’s no native Linux option.)

The steps I actually needed to take to set up wifi on my Fedora 13 desktop probably only amounted to about 10 minutes. Unfortunately it took a lot of false starts to get there. I had installed a Zonet ZEW1642 PCI card, which my initial research suggested would be supported by the built-in rt2860 drivers. As it turned out, it wasn’t that simple. Continue reading

Mac OS X Finder Deleting Files on a Linux Share (Solved)

Last week I connected to my Linux desktop from my Mac laptop, and Finder wouldn’t let me copy files over to the Linux box. Even stranger, it would delete the original file on the share after stating that it didn’t have permission to access it!

The error message it kept popping up was:

The operation can’t be completed because you don’t have permission to access some of the items.

So it didn’t have permission to access or save the items, but it had permission to delete them? Clearly the error message wasn’t telling the whole story!

Even stranger: if I opened a file with an application like TextWrangler or NeoOffice, they had no problem saving it! It was only Finder that had the problem!

Now, I’ve successfully transferred files back and forth between these computers many times before, but I had changed two things recently:

  • Upgraded the Linux box to Fedora 13.
  • Installed the Mac OS X 10.6.4 update to Snow Leopard.

I didn’t have much luck searching online, maybe because I was looking for the wrong terms. The closest I came up with were discussions like this one, but they all involved a server using netatalk or other AFP file sharing implementations. I’ve been using samba (Windows-Style SMB shares) on the Linux box ever since I had some problems with Netatalk and decided that since the Mac would connect via Samba, I wouldn’t worry about it.

I idly posted the problem on Twitter. My brother replied that he’d run into the same problem (on Ubuntu, IIRC), and suggested turning off Unix extensions in Samba. That meant opening up /etc/samba/smb.conf on the Linux box and adding the following line to the “Filesystem Options” section:

unix extensions = no

I restarted Samba on the Linux box, and that was it. The Mac was able to copy files over without any errors!

I hope this post helps someone else solve the same problem.

Nepomuk

I think I finally fixed it.

This stupid “OMG Nepomuk is not running!” error has been dogging me every time I launch KMail, ever since Fedora upgraded KDE. I followed all the directions on fixing Akonadi, and nothing worked. Finally, it turned out that there was a config file telling it to load the old-style “redland” database — which doesn’t exist in current versions of Nepomuk — instead of the new “virtuoso” database.

The file was in ~.kde/share/config/nepomukserverrc and the item in question is “Used Soprano Backend.” I changed it from “redland” to “virtuosobackend” as described here and now it actually starts Nepomuk, and KMail doesn’t complain when I start it!

Someone at KDE decided to massively overcomplicate things!

*grumble*

Dissonance

  • Contrast in the waiting room at the car dealer’s service department: A sad death scene in the movie on TV vs. polka-sounding video game music from a few chairs over. #
  • *sigh* I upgraded my Linux box to Fedora 12 in hopes that it would fix sound. Instead it broke suspend/resume – which I’d rather have on this system if I could only choose one. #