Tag Archives: Apple

Tech Giants’ Core Strategies

The Verge makes an interesting point about Microsoft’s acquisition of Bethesda: for the most part, Microsoft doesn’t care what hardware you run their stuff on, they just want you to buy the software. So it’s less likely to be about trying to gain Xbox exclusives and more likely to be about getting more games for Game Pass.

It reminds me of a blog post I read a few years back comparing the core businesses of various major tech players:

  • Apple sells hardware, and their software and media stores are a way to give you something to do with the hardware.
  • Microsoft sells software, and the hardware is to give you something to run their software on.
  • Google sells ads on services, and their hardware, operating systems, and software (Android, Pixel, Chromebooks, Chrome, etc. ) are there to connect you to their services.
  • Amazon sells stuff, and their hardware is a way to sell you virtual (and sometimes physical) stuff.

That’s why, for instance, you can run Gmail on anything, and Microsoft Office on almost anything, but iTunes, the main Apple program that actually runs on a non-Apple system, is designed primarily to hook you up with an iPhone (previously an iPod). And it’s why you can read Kindle eBooks on a Kindle device, or a Kindle app on an Android or iOS device, and they make it really easy to buy e-books from them, but really inconvenient to import anything from another eBook store.

Facebook is similar to Google in that their core strategy is a service with ads, and their apps and (when they branch out into it with things like Portal) hardware are ways to keep you using their services. Heck, they’re even tying the Oculus headsets to Facebook accounts now.

The post predates the rise of smart speakers and doorbells…but remember how the Echo was originally mostly a way to voice-order things through Amazon? Or Amazon Key, whose primary purpose was to allow delivery services to drop off packages inside your house so you wouldn’t have to worry about porch pirates?

Plus of course everyone wants to sell you subscriptions now!

And yet…it still fits remarkably well.

How to disconnect OneDrive on macOS from an extra account that doesn’t exist anymore.

On my work computer I used to have two OneDrive accounts, one Business and one that Microsoft considered “Personal” even though it was used for work files on my work address. Eventually I deleted the extra “personal” account since we were consolidating.

But every time I restarted the MacBook, it would try to connect to both OneDrive accounts for syncing. I could quit the extra instance of OneDrive and forget about it until the next reboot, but there’s no way to disconnect it without logging in – and the account didn’t exist anymore.

Searching wasn’t helpful, since mostly I found info on how to disconnect from an account that did still exist. Or how to edit the registry. Not much help on a Mac. Even uninstalling and reinstalling OneDrive didn’t do it, because it just pulled both sets of credentials out of my keychain again.

I finally found an answer in one of the newer answers on this forum thread. The main answer wasn’t helpful, but it turns out that, hidden inside the resource folder of the OneDrive app package, there’s a command to reset OneDrive! Yeah, you have to reconnect to the account that does still exist, but that’s both easy and fast!

In brief:

  1. Close OneDrive
  2. Find OneDrive in the Applications Folder
  3. Right-click on it and choose Show Package Contents
  4. Go into the Contents/Resources folder
  5. The file will be either ResetOneDriveApp.command or ResetOneDriveAppStandalone.command. Double-click on it to run the command.
  6. Go back to OneDrive and reconfigure the account that you do still have!

Thanks, Nevyn42, for solving the problem!

I’m Going to Miss the iPod Click Wheel

Fifth generation iPodAs I moved our iTunes library last week, I worried that the new system might not be able to sync with the old iPod, but relaxed when I saw that Apple still sold the click-wheel iPod Classic. They discontinued it a few days later, but fortunately we were able to sync the old devices.

Why do I prefer the older iPods with physical buttons and tiny screens?

Because I listen to music in the car, and a touch screen is a terrible interface for quick actions while driving.

While touch screens are better for menus, searches, finding albums, playlists, artists, and just about anything else, they’re actually dangerous for driving. A physical control of some sort is best for any action you might have to take while behind the wheel of a moving car.

Pause/Play, Skip and Volume. Those are the key things you want to be able to do with music without thinking too much about where you’re reaching, or taking your eyes off the road. (Especially if you have a mix of quiet and loud songs.) Volume’s on the dashboard, but it’s so much easier — and safer — to hit an actual button for pause/play or skip than to jab at the touch screen until you get it right.

Trouble: Moving Your iTunes Library from Mac to Windows

Fifth generation iPodI finally got around to transferring our music library from an old Macintosh (so old it’s a PowerPC) to our new Windows 8.1 system. It worked, but it wasn’t quite as smooth — or as automatic — as I’d hoped it would be.

In theory it’s easy: Copy the iTunes folder from the old system to the new one, whether over the network or using an external drive. Make sure you include the iTunes Library.itl file to keep your playlists, ratings, etc. And if your library is scattered around the drive, be sure to consolidate it first.

Problem 1: Different folder structure. This probably has more to do with which version of iTunes you started with than which platform, but the old system had all its songs in iTunes/Music and the new system had its small collection in iTunes/iTunes Media/Music. So it couldn’t

Problem 2: Illegal characters. The Mac version of iTunes will (or at least used to) use characters in filenames and directories that aren’t allowed on Windows, like question marks and quotation marks. Even after pointing it to the right folder, it was still missing about 70 songs, which I had to manually locate.

Fortunately, iTunes marked the songs that were missing with an exclamation mark in a circle next to the track number. Unfortunately, it wouldn’t sort or filter on it. That meant I needed to page through the entire library looking for those symbols.

Another complication was with albums and artists that didn’t end up lining up correctly in the filesystem: Spamalot, for instance, had each singer listed per song, and one version of iTunes had split it across about 10 folders.

Problem 3: iPod drivers/resync. You have to wipe and re-sync your old iPod. I was expecting this. The problem I had was that Windows set up the drivers…and then that was it. Neither iTunes nor Windows gave any indication that they knew the iPod was there, even though the iPod was showing its “Do not disconnect” message. Well, no indication until iTunes suddenly stopped responding entirely….

Finally I just unplugged the iPod (which rather upset the three-year-old, because it was telling us not to but we did it anyway!), at which point iTunes closed. But the system started responding again, and iTunes came right back up when I opened it. When I plugged it back in (after rebooting the iPod, just to be on the safe side), iTunes recognized it right away and offered to reformat it. It synced without any further complaints!