Category Archives: Troubleshooting

Minecraft Bedrock Beta vs. the Microsoft Store

There’s got to be a better way to do this. Actually, I know there’s a better way to do this, because Minecraft already does it in Java Edition.

How to try out snapshots in Minecraft Java Edition:

  • Change the version in the launcher.

How to go back to the stable version:

  • Change the version in the launcher.

How to try out betas in Minecraft Windows 10 Edition:

  • Log in as someone who Microsoft knows is an adult, because Xbox Insider only allows 18 and up.
  • Sign up for Xbox Insider
  • Sign up for the Minecraft beta in Xbox Insider
  • Download updates on your Microsoft Store apps and hope it installs the beta.

How to go back to the stable version:

  • Leave the beta in Xbox Insider
  • Download updates on your Microsoft Store apps and hope it goes back to the other version.
  • Back up your saved games, which are buried deep in a hidden folder with cryptic names. Seriously, they’re in $homedir\AppData\Local\Packages\Microsoft.MinecraftUWP_8wekyb3d8bbwe\LocalState\games\com.mojang\
  • Uninstall Minecraft from every account on the computer, which will also erase all of your saved worlds, which is why you needed to back them up first. (oops.)
  • Reinstall Minecraft
  • Restore your saved games

There’s a known issue where leaving the beta doesn’t always work — especially if there are multiple accounts on the computer that have Minecraft installed. The only reliable fix so far is to uninstall every copy of Minecraft (Bedrock edition) on the computer, in every user’s account.

I’m just glad I found out that uninstalling the app deletes all your worlds before having to uninstall it on the kid’s login!

Oop Store

The Microsoft Store for Windows really feels a lot more fragile to me than either the standard run-an-installer paradigm or the Linux style package manager. I haven’t dug into its inner workings, but it seems like something that came out of the mobile and console ecosystems…and hasn’t been completely adapted to running on a general computer.

For example: Applications are only accessible for the user who installed them, like on Android. But sometimes it downloads the app all over again, and sometimes it doesn’t. It’s not even clear how much is stored system-wide vs. per-user.

As near as I can tell, the Microsoft Store will only download the application if it’s newer than a version that’s already on the computer. So if the beta is newer than the stable release, and the beta still exists somewhere on the computer (like in another user’s account), it’ll just use that one instead of re-downloading it.

Unsaved

But regardless of how it handles multiple installations on the same computer, it’s inexcusable that there is literally no way to reinstall a broken copy of the game and keep your potentially years of progress on a world without first digging into a hidden folder, then through seven levels of folders with generic or cryptic names just to find your saved games and manually copying your saved games before you uninstall and reinstall the game.

It shouldn’t delete your games (at least not without asking).

And it should keep them somewhere you can find more easily.

How to disconnect OneDrive on macOS from an extra account that doesn’t exist anymore.

On my work computer I used to have two OneDrive accounts, one Business and one that Microsoft considered “Personal” even though it was used for work files on my work address. Eventually I deleted the extra “personal” account since we were consolidating.

But every time I restarted the MacBook, it would try to connect to both OneDrive accounts for syncing. I could quit the extra instance of OneDrive and forget about it until the next reboot, but there’s no way to disconnect it without logging in – and the account didn’t exist anymore.

Searching wasn’t helpful, since mostly I found info on how to disconnect from an account that did still exist. Or how to edit the registry. Not much help on a Mac. Even uninstalling and reinstalling OneDrive didn’t do it, because it just pulled both sets of credentials out of my keychain again.

I finally found an answer in one of the newer answers on this forum thread. The main answer wasn’t helpful, but it turns out that, hidden inside the resource folder of the OneDrive app package, there’s a command to reset OneDrive! Yeah, you have to reconnect to the account that does still exist, but that’s both easy and fast!

In brief:

  1. Close OneDrive
  2. Find OneDrive in the Applications Folder
  3. Right-click on it and choose Show Package Contents
  4. Go into the Contents/Resources folder
  5. The file will be either ResetOneDriveApp.command or ResetOneDriveAppStandalone.command. Double-click on it to run the command.
  6. Go back to OneDrive and reconfigure the account that you do still have!

Thanks, Nevyn42, for solving the problem!

Firefox Thinks It’s Running an Older Version Than Last Time (But Isn’t!)

I finally upgraded to Fedora 30 today, and when I launched Firefox for the first time, it complained that I was running an older version than the last time I’d used it, and needed to create a new profile.

Using an older version of Firefox can corrupt bookmarks and browsing history already saved to an existing Firefox profile. To protect your information, create a new profile for this installation of Firefox.

Wait, what?

OK, Firefox did release two emergency updates yesterday. Maybe Fedora 29 got 67.0.4 and Fedora 30 got 67.0.3, and DNF decided it was important to downgrade to the Fedora 30-provided version?

No, both were still on 67.0.3. So what could be going on?

A quick search turmed up a Reddit thread on the problem that pointed me to the solution: Look for the compatibility.ini file in my Firefox profile, and delete the LastVersion line.

It worked! Firefox launched happily, with all my settings and everything.

I made a note of the version that was in there before, and the version that got placed when I launched it, and that cleared up what had caused the confusion.

Apparently, Fedora built the F30 package earlier in the day than the F29 package! 🤦‍♂️

Fedora 29: 67.0.3_20190619204842/20190619204842
Fedora 30: 67.0.3_20190619113000/20190619113000

So it was technically “older” … just not in any meaningful sense.

How to get Grails to use a reserved word with Microsoft SQL

If you’re building a Grails application using a Microsoft SQL database, and you want to have a property on an object that’s a reserved word in MSSQL, like RULE, you’ll probably end up with a SQL syntax error because Grails, Gorm and Hibernate don’t know what words are reserved in MSSQL.

You can just use another name. Does the property need to be called MyObject.rule? You might want to call it something more specific anyway. Problem avoided!

But if you want to keep the name, or if you can’t change it in the DB (say, because you’re connecting to a legacy database), you can get it to work!

Use a custom mapping. Grails lets you map a domain object’s properties to a column that doesn’t fit the usual camelCase → snake_case pattern, and you can use the same mechanism to add the delimiters that MSSQL needs to use the reserved word as a column name. Problem solved!

static mapping = {
    rule column: '[rule]'
}

Now Gorm/Hibernate will use the right delimiters on the back-end, and you can keep accessing myObject.rule, MyObject.findByRule() and so on.

Groovy, null, and ‘null’

Groovy will let you call toString() on a null object. The result is the word ‘null’, which might be what you’re expecting if you know the object is null, but probably isn’t what you’re expecting if you don’t.

So if you’re, say, binding a SQL parameter and you forget to check for nulls like you would in Java, and you forget to use a null-safe operator like you should in Groovy, and you get a null value, what happens? Does groovy…

  1. Throw a NullPointerException like Java?
  2. Set the field to null?

Neither. It sets the field to the string ‘null’.

Make sure to use myVariable?.toString() instead of myVariable.toString() for cases like this!