Category Archives: Linux

Firefox Thinks It’s Running an Older Version Than Last Time (But Isn’t!)

I finally upgraded to Fedora 30 today, and when I launched Firefox for the first time, it complained that I was running an older version than the last time I’d used it, and needed to create a new profile.

Using an older version of Firefox can corrupt bookmarks and browsing history already saved to an existing Firefox profile. To protect your information, create a new profile for this installation of Firefox.

Wait, what?

OK, Firefox did release two emergency updates yesterday. Maybe Fedora 29 got 67.0.4 and Fedora 30 got 67.0.3, and DNF decided it was important to downgrade to the Fedora 30-provided version?

No, both were still on 67.0.3. So what could be going on?

A quick search turmed up a Reddit thread on the problem that pointed me to the solution: Look for the compatibility.ini file in my Firefox profile, and delete the LastVersion line.

It worked! Firefox launched happily, with all my settings and everything.

I made a note of the version that was in there before, and the version that got placed when I launched it, and that cleared up what had caused the confusion.

Apparently, Fedora built the F30 package earlier in the day than the F29 package! 🤦‍♂️

Fedora 29: 67.0.3_20190619204842/20190619204842
Fedora 30: 67.0.3_20190619113000/20190619113000

So it was technically “older” … just not in any meaningful sense.

Recent Tech Links: Unmaintainable Code, XKCD on The Cloud and More

Setting up a Wireless Network on Linux: Ralink 3062 and Network Manager

Ah, memories! These days, setting up hardware on Linux is often easier than it is in Windows. Lots of drivers are built-in and auto-detected, and many are provided through a distribution channel that makes it almost as easy.

Wireless networking, however, is a bit of a throwback to the old days. Half the hardware doesn’t have Linux drivers, and half of the devices that do require you to hunt for the driver — based on the chipset, of course, not on the name or model number on the box — and compile it yourself. (At least these days, you can sometimes run a tool to adapt the Windows drivers if there’s no native Linux option.)

The steps I actually needed to take to set up wifi on my Fedora 13 desktop probably only amounted to about 10 minutes. Unfortunately it took a lot of false starts to get there. I had installed a Zonet ZEW1642 PCI card, which my initial research suggested would be supported by the built-in rt2860 drivers. As it turned out, it wasn’t that simple. Continue reading

Mac OS X Finder Deleting Files on a Linux Share (Solved)

Last week I connected to my Linux desktop from my Mac laptop, and Finder wouldn’t let me copy files over to the Linux box. Even stranger, it would delete the original file on the share after stating that it didn’t have permission to access it!

The error message it kept popping up was:

The operation can’t be completed because you don’t have permission to access some of the items.

So it didn’t have permission to access or save the items, but it had permission to delete them? Clearly the error message wasn’t telling the whole story!

Even stranger: if I opened a file with an application like TextWrangler or NeoOffice, they had no problem saving it! It was only Finder that had the problem!

Now, I’ve successfully transferred files back and forth between these computers many times before, but I had changed two things recently:

  • Upgraded the Linux box to Fedora 13.
  • Installed the Mac OS X 10.6.4 update to Snow Leopard.

I didn’t have much luck searching online, maybe because I was looking for the wrong terms. The closest I came up with were discussions like this one, but they all involved a server using netatalk or other AFP file sharing implementations. I’ve been using samba (Windows-Style SMB shares) on the Linux box ever since I had some problems with Netatalk and decided that since the Mac would connect via Samba, I wouldn’t worry about it.

I idly posted the problem on Twitter. My brother replied that he’d run into the same problem (on Ubuntu, IIRC), and suggested turning off Unix extensions in Samba. That meant opening up /etc/samba/smb.conf on the Linux box and adding the following line to the “Filesystem Options” section:

unix extensions = no

I restarted Samba on the Linux box, and that was it. The Mac was able to copy files over without any errors!

I hope this post helps someone else solve the same problem.