Category Archives: Tech

Solved: NginX serving different localhost sites to Chromium vs. Safari or Firefox

I ran into a weird problem testing some websites on a local NginX installation on my Mac, where it was sending different sites to Firefox and Chrome for the same URL.

I’d put the server names into /etc/hosts pointing to 127.0.0.1, and I’d set up NginX with multiple server {} blocks, each with a different server_name. But while Chrome would load the individual sites for one.example.com and two.example.com, Firefox would always get the content from one.example.com.

A little more testing confirmed that all Chromium-based web browsers (I tried Edge, Opera, Brave and Vivaldi) were getting the correct sites, but Firefox and Safari were both getting the wrong server’s content.

When I compared the server blocks, I noticed that one.example.com was listening on both IPv4 and IPv6, but two.example.com was listening only on IPv4. I added the second listen directive, reloaded nginx, and voila! It worked in Firefox and Safari!

    listen 443 ssl;
    listen [::]:443 ssl;
    server_name  two.example.com;

So apparently, even though I’d only pointed two.example.com to 127.0.0.7 (IPv4), Firefox and Safari were connecting to ::1 (IPv6) instead. And since NginX had only connected one.example.com to that interface, that’s the site it loaded. It’s not clear whether Firefox and Safari are both doing something weird and Chrome isn’t, or they’re both using a MacOS system resolver and Chromium is doing its own thing.

TL;DR: If you listen to IPV6 in one localhost server {} block, listen to it in all of them!

Overload the Cores

I finally got around to trying out No Man’s Sky a few weeks ago. I started on a super-hot planet, where you need to find shelter and/or resources to recharge your suit’s hazard protection system to keep cool. Got killed a few times trying to figure out what I was doing. And after about 20 minutes, my computer spontaneously shut itself down.

I waited a few minutes to let it cool down, then tried again. Managed to figure out a bit more of what I needed to do in the game, and then the same thing happened.

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What is up with MacOS system updates?

On Monday, the home laptop mysteriously started lagging on heavily-modded Minecraft worlds that it had been just fine with the day before. Katie tried all kinds of troubleshooting over the next few days: using different launchers, trying local and server-based games, disabling mods, reinstalling Sophos, rebooting the system repeatedly. Nothing helped.

Until she checked the system update panel. Sure, it had a notification dot, but it always has one because it wants us to update to Big Sur, and we’re not quite ready to upgrade the system from Catalina. So it wasn’t obvious that it hadn’t actually installed Monday’s macOS update despite multiple reboots and a checkbox to automatically install updates.

Not that you’d expect a missing update to be the cause of the problem, since the lag only just started happening. But still, worth a shot. Especially since it started around the time the update was released.

(Incidentally, 2.3 GB? It’s only been a few weeks since the previous update. Did Apple just give up on deltas a while back and start shipping the entire OS every time there’s a bug fix?)

She had to manually tell it to install, and then force-shutdown the machine, because it wouldn’t restart on its own. Then the update installed.

And the Minecraft lag mysteriously disappeared.

Which means one of two things happened. Either:

  • Just knowing that the update existed caused something to chew up or block resources.
  • The OS silently started to install the update and got stuck, leaving the system in a broken state without telling anyone.

Neither of those is what I’d call encouraging.

Ya-who? Flickr and Tumblr Were Lucky!

Huh. Verizon has sold what remains of Yahoo! and AOL.

For half of what they paid for them. 🤦‍♂️

To a private equity firm. 😬

Apparently the division formerly known as Oath and later as Verizon Media Group will be called Yahoo going forward, which is probably a good move.

I’ve got to say, though: Flickr and Tumblr really lucked out that Verizon sold them to companies that actually had something to do with their core service. Flickr went to SmugMug, a photo-sharing company, and Tumblr went to Automattic, a blogging company.

I’d like to think someone at Verizon put in the effort to find a good fit for each. It’s probably more likely that they just weren’t in a hurry at the time, since they still thought they could get something out of the rest of what they bought from Yahoo.