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Speedster Heroes:

Teams:

Other Heroes:

See Also:

Characters are listed on this page for any of the following reasons:

  • It’s a temporary entry until I have a chance to put together a full profile.
  • I don’t have enough information for full profile.
  • The character is basically a footnote, but should be listed for completeness’ sake.
  • The character is well-enough known that you already know who he/she is. These are included only to list Flash/Impulse appearances.

You can check out my current priorities on the Future Plans page. Also, I did many of these from memory, so there may be some inaccuracies. If you spot one before I do, please let me know.


Speedsters

Agent Flashling

[Agent Flashling being digitized] Imp-like speedster of some future era who joined in the fight against the legacy of Cobalt Blue.

Appearances: Flash #148–149 (1999)

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Flash: Thondor Allen

[Flash Thondor Allen and Impulse] The Flash of some future era, a fifth-generation Jupiter colonist who grew to enormous size due to the higher gravity. Unfortunately, his bulk tended to counteract his speed.

Appearances: Flash #146–149 (1999), pictured in The Life Story of the Flash (1997)

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Flash: 67th Century

[Flash of the 67th Century] Nothing is known of this future speedster, save that he will be an ally of his era’s Superman, Wonder Woman, Aquaman and others.

Appearances: Superman: Man of Tomorrow #1,000,000 (1998)

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Flash: League of Titans

[Flash of the near future] In one possible future, 15 years after the events of 52, he will be a member of the League of Titans — a combination of the Justice League and Teen Titans — alongside Superman, Power Girl, Nightwing, Starfire and Red Tornado.

Appearances: The Last Days of Animal Man (2009)

Yes, that was the best picture I could find of the costume. It seems they weren’t terribly interested in showing off the design.

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G-Force

Alien speedster who lost a cosmic race. He fell to Earth, and the two gamblers in charge decided we should provide the next contestant.

Appearance: Flash #136 (1998)

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The Glimmer

[The Glimmer] For eons Wonderworld patrolled the borders of the universe, home to giant archetypes standing guard against the abyss. When the anti-sun Mageddon finally destroyed Wonderworld, only the speedster known as the Glimmer survived. Vowing it would not happen again, he ran through time to “the one place where anybody in history ever made a stand” against the primordial annihilator: present-day Earth. The Glimmer provided the energy needed to temporarily give the entire human race super powers for the final assault on Mageddon, saving half the galaxy in the process. His current whereabouts are unknown.

Appearances: JLA #12 & #40–41 (2000)

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Impala

[Impala] Zulu speedster who was a member of the Global Guardians. He lost his powers in Justice League Quarterly #17, and is now a political activist in his native South Africa. (See bio @ The Unofficial Global Guardians Site.)

No modern Flash-related appearances.
Real Name: Mbulaze
First Appearance: Super Friends #7 (October 1977)
Profiled in Who’s Who in the DC Universe #9 under Global Guardians (November 1985) and in The DC Comics Encyclopedia under Global Guardians (2004).

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Más y Menos

[Más y Menos (DCU)] It was recently revealed that these twin speedsters exist in the DC Universe, and were briefly members of the Teen Titans during the missing year after Infinite Crisis. Nothing else is known about them.

No modern Flash-related appearances.
Real Names: Unknown
See Also: Más y Menos (animated)
First Appearance (DCU): Teen Titans (third series) #38 (September 2006) (photo only)
Further Appearances: 52 #32 (cameo)

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Teams

The Conglomerate

[Conglomerate Logo] A superhero team created in response to the U.N. sponsored Justice League International, by Booster Gold and Claire Montgomery (ex-wife and rival of Maxwell Lord, the driving force behind the JLI) using corporate backing. Their sponsors initially wanted to control the group, which led to funding and P.R. problems when they struck out on their own.

The group has had several incarnations, most of them short-lived. Members have included Slipstream and Jesse Quick.

First Appearance: Justice League Quarterly #1 (1990)
Profiled in Who’s Who (loose-leaf edition) #6 (January 1991) and in The DC Comics Encyclopedia (2004)

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Justice Society of America (JSA)

The original super-team, formed during the 1940s by various American “mystery men” including Flash I Jay Garrick.

The JSA has been relaunched in modern days as a combination training and legacy team. Some of the original members, kept fit by their powers, stay on, while others are the children, grandchildren, or other inheritors of first-generation heroes. Liberty Belle II is among the recent recruits to the modern JSA.

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Young Justice

This team started out simply as Impulse, Robin III, and Superboy hanging out and running into trouble to solve. They soon became a team, and added Arrowette, Wonder Girl II, and the Secret. Over time the team grew larger, until it disbanded in the wake of a disaster at S.T.A.R. Labs that left Titans Troia and Omen dead. Several of the members went on to join the next group of Teen Titans.

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Other Heroes

Aquaman

Former king of Atlantis and founding member of the Justice League.

Significant Silver-Age Flash Appearances

  • Flash #327 (November 1983): “Burnout!” Cary Bates
  • Flash #329 (January 1984): “What is the Secret of... Simian & Son,” Cary Bates

Significant Legacy-Era Flash Appearances

  • Flash #66 (July 1992): “Fish Story,” Mark Waid
  • Flash #163 (August 2000): “Heartbeat,” Pat McGreal

Aquaman has also had a few cameos, but I won’t go into those.

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Batman

Everyone knows who Batman is. Young Bruce Wayne saw his parents killed in a mugging, then grew up determined to fight crime. Deciding criminals were a cowardly, superstitious lot, he adopted a bat-like costume, and now uses martial arts, detective skills, and the vast resources of Wayne Industries to keep the streets of Gotham City safe.

Significant Silver Age Flash Appearances

  • Flash #204 (March 1971): “The Great Secret Identity Exposé!” Robert Kanigher
  • Flash #207 (June 1971): “The Evil Sound of Music!” Mike Friedrich
  • Flash #276 (August 1979): “Freakout!” Cary Bates
  • Flash #277 (September 1979): “The Self-Destruct Flash,” Cary Bates
  • Brave and the Bold #99 (January 1972): “The Man Who Murdered the Past!” Bob Haney
  • Brave and the Bold #125 (March 1976): “Streets of Poison,” Bob Haney
  • Brave and the Bold #151 (June 1979): “Disco of Death!” Bob Haney
  • Brave and the Bold #194 (January 1983): “Trade Heroes—and Win!” Mike W. Barr

Significant Legacy-Era Flash/Impulse Appearances

  • Impulse #50 (July 1999): “First Fool’s,” Todd Dezago
  • Flash #163 (August 2000): “Heartbeat,” Pat McGreal
  • Flash #205 (February 2004): “Ignition Part 5: Secrets,” Geoff Johns
  • Flash #209 (June 2004): “Fast Friends,” Geoff Johns
  • Flash #215 (December 2004): “The Secret of Barry Allen, Part Two: Reformed,” Geoff Johns
  • Flash #217 (February 2005): “Post-Crisis,” Geoff Johns

Significant One-Year-Later Flash Appearances

  • All-Flash #1 (September 2007): “Justice, Like Lightning,” Mark Waid
  • Flash #233 (December 2007): “The Wild Wests, Part 3: Fleeting Lives,” Mark Waid
  • Flash #239 (June 2008): “Fast Money Part 2,” Tom Peyer (cameo)
  • Brave and the Bold #13 (July 2008): “American Samuroids,” Mark Waid

Batman has also had a few cameos, but I won’t go into those.

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Captain Marvel

When teen-aged reporter Billy Batson says “Shazam!” he becomes a superhero with the wisdom of Solomon, the strength of Hercules, the stamina of Atlas, the power of Zeus, the courage of Achilles and the speed of Mercury.

Appearances: Flash #107, #1,000,000, 162 (1995, 1998, 2000)
Profiled in Who’s Who in the DC Universe #4 (June 1985) and Who’s Who Update ’87 #2 (September 1987).

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Darkstar Ferrin Colos

The Darkstars are galactic lawmen similar in concept to the Green Lanterns (see Hal Jordan). Colos first came to Earth following a weapons smuggling ring, and found that there was enough alien criminal activity to warrant sticking around. He eventually discovered too much about a corrupt supervisor and was replaced by Donna Troy.

Appearances: Green Lantern #40 (1993), Darkstars #18–20 (1994)
Profiled in Who’s Who (loose-leaf edition) Update 93 #2 under Darkstars (January 1993) and in The DC Comics Encyclopedia under Darkstars (2004).

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Green Arrow: Oliver Queen

Former wealthy businessman who, stranded on an island, became an expert archer out of necessity. He later stopped a criminal outside a costume party where he was dressed as Robin Hood, launching his super-hero career as Green Arrow. Sometime member of the Justice League, he was killed battling terrorists, but brought back to life by the Spectre.

Significant Silver-Age Flash Appearances

  • Flash #204 (March 1971): “The Great Secret Identity Exposé!” Robert Kanigher
  • Flash #327 (November 1983): “Burnout!” Cary Bates
  • Flash #329 (January 1984): “What is the Secret of... Simian & Son,” Cary Bates

Significant Legacy-Era Flash/Impulse Appearances

  • Flash/Green Lantern: The Brave and the Bold #4 (January 2000): “How Many Times Can A Man Turn His Head?” Mark Waid and Tom Peyer
  • Flash #209 (June 2004): “Fast Friends,” Geoff Johns
  • Flash #214–216 (November 2004–January 2005): “The Secret of Barry Allen,” Geoff Johns

This list may be incomplete. Additionally, Green Arrow appeared in a number of solo backup stories in The Flash during the 1970s.

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Green Arrow: Connor Hawke

Son of the original Green Arrow, Connor grew up in a monastery. He took on the Green Arrow identity when his father was killed.

Significant Flash Appearances

  • Green Lantern #96, Green Arrow #130, Flash #135 (March 1998): “Three of a Kind,” Ron Marz, Chuck Dixon, Grant Morrison, Mark Millar
  • Flash #216 (January 2005): “The Secret of Barry Allen Part Three: Spinning,” Geoff Johns

This list may be incomplete.

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Green Lantern: John Stewart

Alternate Green Lantern for the sector containing Earth during Hal Jordan’s tenure, later put in charge of the Mosaic world (a patchwork of cities stolen from different planets by a mad Guardian of the Universe). After the Green Lanterns were wiped out, he worked with the Darkstars for a while. Paralyzing injuries forced him to retire, and he became an architect. After he was healed, he took up the Green Lantern ring again, joining the Justice League in Kyle Rayner᾿s place.

John Stewart is also the Green Lantern in the Animated Justice League continuity.

Significant Flash Appearances

  • Flash #209 (June 2004): “Fast Friends,” Geoff Johns
  • Flash #233 (December 2007): “The Wild Wests, Part 3: Fleeting Lives,” Mark Waid
  • Flash #235–236 (February–March 2008): “The Wild Wests,” Parts 5–6, Mark Waid
  • Flash #239 (June 2008): “Fast Money Part 2,” Tom Peyer (cameo)

This list may be incomplete.

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Hawkman

The history’s too complicated to get into; suffice it to say that he dresses like a hawk, flies, and prefers ancient weapons. And he’s a reincarnation of an ancient Egyptian pharoah.

Significant Silver-Age Flash Appearances

  • Flash #204 (March 1971): “The Great Secret Identity Exposé!” Robert Kanigher
  • Flash #327 (November 1983): “Burnout!” Cary Bates
  • Flash #329 (January 1984): “What is the Secret of... Simian & Son,” Cary Bates

Significant Legacy-Era Flash Appearances

  • Hawkworld Annual 1 (1990): “A Hawkman of Two Worlds?” John Ostrander
  • Flash #191 (December 2002): “The Brave and the Beaten,” Geoff Johns
  • Flash #209 (June 2004): “Fast Friends,” Geoff Johns (cameo)
  • Flash #214–216 (November 2004–January 2005): “The Secret of Barry Allen,” Geoff Johns (cameo)

This list may be incomplete.

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Superman

Let’s face it: you already know who Superman is. Last survivor of the planet Krypton, raised as Clark Kent in Smallville, reporter for the Daily Planet in Metropolis, etc. What you may not know is which issues of Flash and Impulse he has appeared in, or which issues of his own series have featured the Flash or Impulse.

Significant Silver-Age Flash Appearances

  • Superman #199 (August 1967): “Superman’s Race with the Flash!” Jim Shooter
  • Flash #175 (December 1967): “The Race to the End of the Universe,” E. Nelson Bridwell
  • World’s Finest #198–199 (November–December 1970): “Race to Save the Universe,” Denny O’Neill
  • Flash #203 (February 1971): “The Flash’s Wife is a Two-Timer!” Robert Kanigher
  • Flash #204 (March 1971): “The Great Secret Identity Exposé!” Robert Kanigher
  • Flash #249 (May 1977): “A Hero Named Super!” Cary Bates
  • Flash #276 (August 1979): “Freakout!” Cary Bates
  • Flash #277 (September 1979): “The Self-Destruct Flash,” Cary Bates
  • Flash #327 (November 1983): “Burnout!” Cary Bates
  • Flash #329 (January 1984): “What is the Secret of... Simian & Son,” Cary Bates

Significant Legacy-Era Flash/Impulse Appearances

  • Adventures of Superman #463 (February 1990): “Speed Kills!” Dan Jurgens
  • Flash #53 (August 1991): “Fast Friends,” William Messner-Loebs
  • Adventures of Superman #533 (March 1996): “Scavenger Hunt,” Karl Kesel
  • Impulse #47 (April 1999): “Lessons in Fear,” William Messner-Loebs
  • Flash #159 (April 2000): “Whirlwind Ceremony,” Mark Waid and Brian Augustyn
  • Flash #163 (August 2000): “Heartbeat,” Pat McGreal
  • Impulse #67 (December 2000): “Friends Like These...” Todd Dezago (cameo)
  • DC First: Flash/Superman (July 2002): “Speeding Bullets,” Geoff Johns
  • Flash #209 (June 2004): “Fast Friends,” Geoff Johns

Significant One-Year-Later Flash Appearances

  • All-Flash #1 (September 2007): “Justice, Like Lightning,” Mark Waid
  • Flash #233 (December 2007): “The Wild Wests, Part 3: Fleeting Lives,” Mark Waid
  • Flash #237 (April 2008): “Superman’s Cape,” Keith Champagne
  • Flash #239 (June 2008): “Fast Money Part 2,” Tom Peyer (cameo)
  • (Need to check last arc)

Significant Rebirth-Era Flash Appearances

  • Flash: Rebirth #3 (August 2009): “Rearview Mirrors,” Geoff Johns
  • DC Universe Halloween Special ’09 (December 2009): “To the Finish Line,” Billy Tucci

Superman has also had a few cameos, mostly with the rest of the JLA, but I won’t go into those.

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Wonder Woman

Raise your hand if you don’t know who Wonder Woman is. Anyone? Bueller? OK, just for the record, she is Diana, daughter of Queen Hippolyta of the Amazons, immortal warrior-women who live on the hidden Paradise Island. She won a personal combat contest to be an ambassador to the outside world, and became a super-hero.

Significant Silver-Age Flash Appearances

  • Flash #276 (August 1979): “Freakout!” Cary Bates
  • Flash #277 (September 1979): “The Self-Destruct Flash,” Cary Bates
  • Flash #323 (July 1983): “Run, Flash—Run For Your Wife!” Cary Bates
  • Flash #327 (November 1983): “Burnout!” Cary Bates
  • Flash #329 (January 1984): “What is the Secret of... Simian & Son,” Cary Bates

Significant Legacy-Era Flash/Impulse Appearances

  • Wonder Woman Plus Jesse Quick #1 (January 1997): “Heroes!” Christopher Priest
  • Flash #163 (August 2000): “Heartbeat,” Pat McGreal
  • Impulse #67 (December 2000): “Friends Like These...” Todd Dezago (cameo)
  • Flash #209 (June 2004): “Fast Friends,” Geoff Johns
  • Flash #219 & Wonder Woman #214 (April–May 2005): “Truth or Dare,” Geoff Johns & Greg Rucka
  • Flash #233 (December 2007): “The Wild Wests, Part 3: Fleeting Lives,” Mark Waid
  • Flash #235–236 (February–March 2008): “The Wild Wests,” Parts 5–6, Mark Waid

Wonder Woman has also had a few cameos, mostly with the rest of the JLA, but I won’t go into those.

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Zatanna

Magician who uses her abilities both on stage and to protect others, Zatanna is both a famous performer and a former member of the Justice League. Her father, Zatara, was a stage magician who also fought crime. Zatanna casts spells by speaking the words backwards.

Significant Silver-Age Flash Appearances

  • Flash #198 (June 1970): “Call It... Magic,” Mike Friedrich

Significant Legacy-Era Flash/Impulse Appearances

  • Impulse #17 (September 1996): “Quicker than the Eye,” Mark Waid
  • Impulse #67 (December 2000): “Friends Like These...” Todd Dezago
  • Flash #209 (June 2004): “Fast Friends,” Geoff Johns (cameo)
  • Flash #214–216 (November 2004–January 2005): “The Secret of Barry Allen,” Geoff Johns

This list may be incomplete.

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Text by Kelson Vibber. Do not copy without permission.

Top of Page Art

  • Agent Flashling: Flash #148 (May 1999) - Paul Pelletier and Vince Russell
  • Flash Thondor Allen: Flash #147 (April 1999) - Paul Pelletier and Vince Russell
  • Flash (67th Century): Superman: Man of Tomorrow #1,000,000 (November 1998) - Georges Jeanty and Denis Rodier or Dennis Janke
  • Flash (League of Titans): Last Days of Animal Man #3 (September 2009) - Chris Batista & Dave Meikis
  • Glimmer: JLA #41 (May 2000) - Howard Porter & Drew Geraci
  • Impala: Justice League Quarterly #8 (Autumn 1992) - Andy Smith and Smitty
  • Más y Menos (DCU): Teen Titans (third series) #38 (September 2006) - Carlos Ferreira

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